Role of Inclinometers in Continuous Casting

Role of Inclinometers in Continuous Casting

Sir Henry Bessemer, the English engineer, inventor, and businessman, best known in connection with the Bessemer process for the manufacture of steel, received a patent in the nineteenth century for the continuous casting of metal between two contra rotating rollers.  However, it wasn’t until the 1960’s that this process became widely implemented. Prior to this, steel was poured into stationary molds to form ingots that were then subsequently rolled to form bars of the required section.  As the name suggests, in the continuous casting process molten metal is poured into the mouth of a water-cooled, tapered mold, generally manufactured from copper alloy; the partially cooled metal being withdrawn from the bottom of the mold at a rate maintaining the liquid/solid interface at a constant position.

Every parameter in this apparently simple process has to be continuously controlled with precision in order to control the quality of the finished metal bar and to ensure that the molding machinery is not damaged by the extremely challenging processes.  One of the many important parameters to the quality of the metal bar and the efficiency of the process is the control of the taper angle of the movable side plates of the mold.  Taper can be measured and controlled on-line with the aid of precision inclinometers embedded in the wall of the mold.  Sherborne Sensors’ T935 servo inclinometer, often specifically customized, is frequently utilized in this application. 

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